Late summer and early autumn are the periods when we enjoy the delicacies that nature offers us in abundance at this time, and fall harvest time is here again.

Fall Harvest Time of Grape Offers a Special JoyFall Harvest Time of Grape Offers a Special Joy

In addition to many types of fruit, grapes are the ones we look forward to finally ripening. Whether it is thick grapes of table varieties or sour ones with pips that give wine, they all have one thing in common: they are extremely rich in vitamins and minerals, and consequently, they are highly beneficial to health. Despite the numerous grape varieties, there is still not any type that can be compared in taste to the fresh autumn, red or white varieties in the off-season, so it is not surprising that most people can hardly wait for the harvest. Even though all participants in the harvest work hard all day or even several days, depending on the number and size of vineyards, the harvest can be fun and incredibly relaxing, especially for those who spend most of their time indoors and in the city centers. It is true, however, that we who visit the vineyards perhaps once or twice a year are not even remotely aware of how much energy, work, and time it takes to take care of the vineyards. We don’t think about what procedures were needed when sipping a precious drop. We don’t realize that this one ‘arrived’ from the vineyard into our glass.

Red or White?

Both red and white grapes are good for health if consumed within normal limits. If you want to get more antioxidants into your body, then you better treat yourself to red, as red grapes contain more of them.

We Grow Home Vines

The climber, which needs support and gives us a pleasant shade, a precious drop, and sweet fruit, also requires some of our care.

Above all, we must not forget the summer and winter cut. At the end of summer, when the strawberries begin to ripen, we protect them from birds with nets or place a rattle. The vine needs a lot of sunlight and not too much rainfall for healthy growth. But it will thrive best where the average annual temperature does not fall below eight and a half degrees Celsius.

New vines are planted in the fall, and we choose a noble European vine grafted on an American basis. This protects it from the vine aphid, which was brought from America in the 19th century and destroyed many European vineyards.